Pelco Developer Network (PDN)

VideoOutput Issues

The following are issues that affect the VideoOutput Web Service Reference service.

The PAL and framerate rounding issues apply to the IP110, IP3701, and Spectra IP cameras.


Pre-Endura 1.3 Differences

Prior to Endura 1.3 all three URI tags were directly in VideoOutput Web Service Reference's StreamParameters. Starting with 1.3, the all URI tags reside in VideoOutput Web Service Reference's StreamSession structure.

PAL

Some configuration value settings (framerate, gop, resolution) in VideoQuality MUST BE IN NTSC VALUES, regardless of whether you decide to use PAL.

Some configuration value settings (framerate, gop, resolution) in VideoQuality WILL BE IN NTSC VALUES, regardless of whether you decide to use PAL. (To convert PAL values to NTSC values simply multiply a PAL value by 30/25.) These values will be automatically converted by the device to PAL values if you set the 'tvformat' value to PAL. However, even if you set the tvformat attrbute to PAL, this change will not be apparent even with re-querying the current VideoQuality settings

The only known exception is the IP Spectra series of cameras. If an IP Spectra is set to PAL format, it will return its values in PAL format when queried using the VideoOutput service.

Framerate (FPS) Rounding

IP cameras only work with integer framerate values. If they are given a decimal value, they will automatically round the framerate value down. It should be noted that the VideoOutput Web Service Reference will still report the current framerate as the decimal value. For example, if you enter 12.5 for the framerate, the IP camera will only utilize a framerate of 12; while the VideoOutput Web Service Reference service will still show that the current framerate is 12.5.

Unfortunately the framerate rounding will also affect PAL to NTSC translation. Pelco device settings are in NTSC units. Consequently by default, the primary stream is set for 30 fps and the secondary for 15 fps. Pelco devices tranlates these values to PAL, when a PAL camera is detected, so that it uses 25 and 12.5 respectively. Unfortunately IP cameras truncate the .5 (from 12.5) for usage at the platform level, even though 12.5 is still reported to the outside world as the current framerate.